Heart-shot

The gun, a loaner, was new to me. That’s the excuse, anyway, for not dropping the bird right there, folding it up deader than hell. It flushed from 20 yards away and flew crossing left to right in front of me. But I clipped it.

I did hit it hard enough that I took the gun down and held it at my hips and watched the bird fly. Incredulous is a word that should always be accompanied by a look: Open-mouthed. The way you do when you can’t believe what you’re seeing, like passing a bad wreck on the interstate and looky-looing your ass off even though you tell yourself you shouldn’t.

So I stood there mouth-breathing and keeping an eye on that clipped bird, waiting for it to fall out of the sky. Even though another bird flushed from the same spot and flew even closer to the muzzle of the gun. I refused to look at that second bird, so sure was I that the first was going down.

But the damned bird kept going. And going. Then it sailed, took a few more flaps, sailed some more. Then it flew straight up into the sky as if it had spotted a hole in the heavens and was heading toward the harp music. And it died. Fell straight down. Down being the operative word.

Three hundred feet below and hundreds of yards out, out of sight into a ravine in the sagebrush. Damn again. When you have spent almost all of your energy climbing up a chukar hill, down is the last direction you want to head unless the day has been long and hard and down is a good thing and down means beer and kettle chips and a warm pickup. When you are up there, determined to dispense justice on a chukar population, dropping down, even one foot, is painful. But I marked the last seen sight of the dead chukar dropping out of the sky like detritus from an airliner—right in line with that big green rabbitbrush—called the dog off the rest of the covey she was working, and headed to find it.

We did. Maybe fifteen minutes later, stone dead and right in line with the big green rabbitbrush, deep in the ravine. Took it from the dog, pocketed it, and started back up the slope. Again. Elevation gained, elevation lost. Two steps forward, one step back.

Bird in hand

Someone once told me that birds that towered after being shot, and then died stone dead while they were high in the sky, were heart-shot. So, that’s what we’re calling it here. I know nothing of the forensics of it, but I do know that those towering, dying birds are pretty damned memorable.

There was another cliff in another Nevada years ago. The dog was Sage, another brilliant female with talent and drive. We were lucky to camp right in the thick of the habitat, with chukar laughing us to shame at our campfire of an evening. One afternoon, I worked back toward camp, and took a swing at a wild flushing bird, clipping it in a snap shot. It towered, then fell out of sight hundreds of feet below, but damned close to camp. I took the setter down there and looked for that bird until dark and never found it. The campfire was calling.

The next morning as I was on my morning shovel stroll, I walked about two hundred yards from camp, the dogs following me off into the sagebrush doing their own thing. Then here came Sage carrying a frozen dead chukar. That chukar.

There is another one that sticks too, just for the sheer height of the nosedive. We worked the very top of a cliff that was perhaps two hundred feet sheer, the kind of pucker-cliff that makes you nervous just walking near it, but there were birds there and if they flushed one way, they were totally accessible because a flat bench peeled out to the right for miles. Shoot the left to right birds and you were in tall cotton. Don’t shoot the right to left ones.

Self-control is difficult with the red-legged devils. Some of the finest wing-shots I know have confessed ground-sluicing a covey of running chukar. Not shooting at chukar, even an out-of-range one, is one of the hardest things on the planet to do, particularly if the climb has been hard and the quarry elusive. On this particular cliff, the way I remember it anyway, is that I shot a left to right bird and not a right to left one, but that may not be the case. I do know that the bird took a punch from a fist of 6s and kept on going, veering almost ninety degrees and flying out over 300 feet of cliff and maybe another seven hundred feet of damn near cliff above the valley floor. One thousand feet. I watched the bird get smaller and smaller and smaller until I could barely see it and then all of a sudden, it flew up, straight up, and died. Plummeting. One thousand feet, perhaps. Perhaps even more. I lost sight of it out over the valley floor. Then I looked inside of myself. I could climb all the way down that hill, drop all of that hard-earned elevation, and maybe find the bird. It was mid-morning and a day lay out ahead of us.

Fuck it, said I. I’ll find it on the way back to the truck.

I never did. Hours later, we swept back and forth across the valley floor looking for that bird as the shadows of a gone-away sun brought winter back to the landscape. Finally, with the sagebrush blackening against the night, we gave up and trudged toward the pickup.

Maybe a coyote got it, girl, I said.

It’s a rooster pheasant, though that made for the most memorable heart-shot. We were hunting a tree row just west of a big, beautiful farmstead in eastern Montana when the dog went on point in a clump of Russian olives. The cover was between me and the dog and when the rooster went up it went the dog’s direction, putting the tree between the muzzle and its tail feathers, but I took the shot anyway and hit it hard. It kept going.

This farmstead was a showplace. Matching buildings, matching roofs, well-trimmed shrubs, tightly mowed shelterbelts. The kind of place that made you admirable and envious in the same wave of thought. And a family place too, with homes for the offspring and maybe the old pensioner scattered about. Neatly parked machinery, most of it under cover. Prosperous. Made you think that the owner and his minions spent the entirety of the day working on one thing or another and when there was a spare moment, they got out a paintbrush. They were generous too, sharing their prosperity with us fortunate hunters from the other side of the state.

Meanwhile, this hard-hit-but-still-flying-Chinese-ditch-parrot was still hard hit and still flying. Right toward that vigorous and well-kept farmstead. And now right over that farmstead. And now towering, right up to the sky, and then the lights went out, and the big old cock bird just swapped ends and fell straight down, trailing a 30-inch tail a-fluttering like an advertising banner behind a football stadium bi-plane. Out of sight.

I had no choice but to call the dog to my side and start a long trudge, perhaps a half mile, toward our host’s spick-and-span home. So I did, fully expecting to see the rooster lying dead in the driveway—which was paved—or the lawn—which, were a human head, would have just come from the best barbershop in the city.

It’s an odd thing to tell your dog to hunt dead in someone’s driveway, but I did and she tore off all around the place, looking behind perfectly trimmed pfitzers and under sculpted lilacs. No rooster.

Damn it, I know that S.O.B. died.

We looked everywhere. Behind perfectly parked stock trucks. Under a combine. Next to the John Deere. Next to the corrals. By the milking shed. Under a swather. No rooster, anywhere, and all the while telling myself it had to be stone dead somewhere.

Then I looked up. There, on the roof of one of those beautiful houses, just a foot or so from a dormer window, was the rooster. Our rooster. I looked at Sage.

There he is, I said. How to get it?

That morning, I had stopped at the main house when I had asked for permission, so that’s where I went. It was midday now and I was hopeful someone was home but not optimistic.

Turns out the farmers of that stead didn’t just paint or fix or farm or maintain. In the offseason, they played cards in the middle of the day. About ten of them were sitting around drinking coffee, dealing, shuffling, bluffing and blustering, having a good time when this hunter showed up at their door with an odd request.

“Hey, do you have a ladder by chance?” I said.

“A what?” said Farmer One.

“A ladder. I shot a rooster in that tree row about a half mile west and the damned thing flew over here and died on the roof of that house right there,” I said.

Chairs scooted backwards and everyone went to the window.

“I’ll be damned,” said Farmer Two. “Never seen that before.”

One of the younger of the clan piped up: “I’ll get a ladder.”

Bird on a roof

So we went out into the yard and there, behind a shed, of course hanging neatly on pegs, was a good extension ladder. The farmer started climbing, never even offering another option.

“This is one hell of a full service operation,” I said.

I think he appreciated the compliment.

 

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6 thoughts on “Heart-shot

  1. I’ve seen a few birds tower like you described. Always noteworthy when it happens, and we usually spend the rest of the day saying things like, “I can’t believe that one bird!. It just flew straight up in the air!”

    One of the weirdest kills like that, happened when my brother’s Griff pointed a chukar, I clipped it, and knew I had clipped it, so I yelled, “Watch that one, see where he goes down!” We then watched it sail out at least two hundred yards in front of us and then make a big loop, swing back towards us and, like a boomerang, fly right back in our direction and die stone-cold dead not 20 feet away from that damned Griff, who was standing there, like us, with his jaw gaping. Easiest retrieve he ever had.

    What a well-written piece. Thanks for sharing and reminding me of those experiences.

  2. Wyo Setters

    I used to kinda’ disbelieve the “tower” flight stories of a wounded bird til’ it happened to me last season. Picked a single bird out of a covey flush and took a shot. Didn’t think I hit it as the Chukar sailed off 100+ yards…then it abruptly flew directly upward several feet until it was a tiny dot, only to slowly drop out of the sky like a helicoptering maple tree seed.

    I saw it hit the ground and thought “easy mark”…the dogs didn’t and headed out about 300 yards to the West on locked on point with a new covey. For several minutes I looked and looked for that bird, gave up and went to the dogs. Took care of business on that covey of Chukar and went back to the “tower” scene of the crime to see if the dogs could locate the bird. They pointed the dead Chukar, I bagged it and we moved on.

    Later that night, while dressing the days kill, I carefully cleaned the “tower” bird. Sure enough, found one solitary #6 shot wedged in the heart. Yep, Heart-Shot

  3. Gibson

    Timely. That happened to me this weekend. After two beautiful points on big coveys of chukar, that I whiffed on, Zeb locked down a single out in the sage. The bird performed a towering straight away flush, which chukar never do. Easiest shot of the day. After unloading the over under, that damn bird kept flying like it was no worse for wear! It was my redemption shot after missing on the two previous flushes. So, as I was chastising myself, that sucker did the death flare and Zeb picked it up on a long retrieve. Heart-shot!

  4. Good story. I had heard of towering birds but witnessed it only once a few years back. My setter Jack was locked up in tight aspen cover when the ruffed grouse went out before him. At my shot the bird went up, straight up. I nearly gave it the other barrel but instead Jack and I just watched as it cleared the treetops and climbed into the sky. Finally it folded and fell, landing not thirty yards from where we stood.

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